Binger

2.5 Acres
Plat 16 / Lot 52-2

The Little Compton Agricultural Conservancy Trust purchased a Conservation Easement from Randi vonSteinwher and Matthew Binger on February 21, 2014. The Conservation Easement protects 4.96 acres of property on Plat 16,Lot 52-2. In 2014, 2.46 acres of Plat 16, Lot 52-2 were merged with Plat 16, Lot 75-2, which the Little Compton Agricultural Trust has also preserved. The result was that Plat 16, Lot 75-2 contains 12.5 acres and Plat 16, Lot 52-2 contains 2.5 acres. The Conservation Easement remains on all of the acreage even when merged with other lots.

A Baseline Documentation Report was completed on the property in September 2019. The report outline the history of the property as well as its current land uses (see below). The entire report is available on this website.

Prior Land Uses: The Premises has a long history of agricultural use. Early historic photographs from as far back as 1939 show the Premises in use as a field (most likely for hay and/or pasture with an area of bit scrubbier  and with trees on the east side of the Premises towards Briggs Marsh.  The Premises contains brackish marsh along Briggs Marsh.  Stonewalls were present as far back as 1939 on the western boundary of the Premises.  Between 1962 and 1972, a pond was added to the property directly north of the Premises.  The southern edge of the pond is located on the northeastern boundary of the Premises. The composition of the property is similar to that in 1939.

Current Land Uses: Today, the Premises is a field with an area a bit scrubbier and with trees and finally a brackish marsh along Briggs Marsh, as you move east on the Premises.  A wide perimeter of the field is mowed to lawn height.  It appears that the center of the field is cut for hay once a year.  As of August 31, 2019, the center of the field was very tall and had not yet been cut.  A pond is located on the property directly north of the Premises.  The southern edge of the pond is located on the northeastern boundary of the Premises.  A trail is cut through the woods on the south side of the pond to the edge of the marsh.